Tour de oops…on our American roads


This humorous cartoon by Andy Singer aptly highlights the difference many of cyclists face when riding on many of our roadways for either sport or recreation in the United States versus other countries. With the start of the Tour de France, it seemed appropriate to post. Cheers!

Posted with permission from Andy Singer - Source: andysinger.com

Posted with permission from Andy Singer – Source: andysinger.com

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4 Responses to Tour de oops…on our American roads

  1. bcebicycle says:

    I was thinking something along these lines on my way to work today. Great cartoon, and accurate. It is tough to watch the tour and then consider the fight we have just tooling to work. Things will change it just takes time.

    Like

  2. jsallen1 says:

    The cartoon makes an apples and oranges comparison of a bicycle race in France in a rural area with everyday cycling in the USA in a city. France has a very nice network of paved farm roads and great Michelin maps, but when it is necessary to use a numbered highway, you’ll find that it is about 2/3 as wide as in the USA — as wide as the farm roads, no shoulders, but with highway traffic, and the roads won’t be closed for ordinary bicycle tourists. As to city cycling, the main things I noticed in Paris in 1989 were air pollution far worse than in any US city, because the US had adopted pollution control much earlier; and that drivers were courteous, except for motorcyclists, who rode crazy people. Maybe France has caught up with the USA on pollution control by now.

    Like

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