A capital idea – bike sharing in Greater Lansing


Source: treehugger.com

Back in late October of 2011, I wrote a post about bike sharing programs instituted by major universities and cities in the United States and Canada. Here in Greater Lansing, 1,051 area residents responded to a survey about establishing a bike sharing program. The results present some fascinating data about the potential of a bike sharing program in Greater Lansing, including:

  • 59 percent of the respondents were between 18-35 years of age and another 29 percent were 36-54 years of age.
  • 28 percent of the respondents use their bike(s) often for transportation purposes (not recreation).
  • 70 percent of the respondents are very likely or somewhat likely to use a bike sharing program.
  • The preferred annual membership fee for a bike sharing program is in the range of $25 to $50 per year (combined for 54%) with the preferred payment methods being cash or credit/debit cards.

SOURCE: Capital Community Bikeshare

To further this effort, Capital Community Bike Share will be holding a special planning charette on Monday, April 9, 2012 from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm. The charette will be held in Lansing’s Foster Community Center which is located at 200 Foster Avenue, just north of Michigan Avenue. The goals of the special planning charette are to use maps and overlays of other transit and transportation information to:
  • Plan bike share station locations, bike lanes, and other enhancements.
  • Create a blueprint for a door-to-door integrated network.
Assisting in this important community event will be the University of Michigan’s SMART program. SMART stands for Sustainable Mobility & Accessibility Research & Transformation. To RSVP for this event or for more information, please email smartLansing@gmail.com or call 517-292-3078. Hope to see you there!
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This entry was posted in Bicycling, cities, climate change, culture, environment, fun, health, land use, placemaking, planning, spatial design, tourism, trails, transit, transportation, urban planning and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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